Charcoal + Graphite

Here are many of the traditional works produced from 2012–2015. I worked in two primary traditional mediums—charcoal and graphite. Subjects include still life and imaginary objects.


"Beginnings"
January 2014 | Charcoal | 20” x 30”



"Skull Study"
April 2016 | Charcoal | 24" x 36"

This piece depicts the skull of a small mammal, an item that is part of the Rhode Island School of Design's Edna Lawrence Nature Lab.



"Skylight"
October 2015 | Charcoal | 24" x 36"

☆ This piece was selected to exhibit in the Foundation Studies Drawing Exhibition at the Rhode Island School of Design's Waterman Gallery. 

 

"Ox Skull I"
April 2016 | Charcoal | 24" x 36" 



"Ox Skull II"
April 2016 | Charcoal | 24" x 36"



"Paper Structures"
October 2015 | Charcoal | 24" x 36"

This piece was a drawing of origami sculptures inspired by nature forms. These nature forms included seashells, conches, and invertebrate spines.



"Swapped"
July 2014 | Graphite | 18" x 24” 

☆ This piece received a gold key in the Drawing and Illustration division of The Scholastic, Inc. Art and Writing Awards. ☆

Most of us love to munch on bite-sized candy. But what would you do if the scripts were flipped, you waking up to a giant truffle wanting a bite out of you? This piece portrays a self-invented parallel universe in which human beings have swapped roles with bite-sized Ferrero Rocher chocolates. The chocolate "species" have broken their way out of their golden foil wrappers and been given human characteristics: sentience, size, mobility, hunger, and savagery; while human beings been relegated to small, inanimate objects. They are represented by toy soldiers, plastic and immobile. Each are constrained under the feet, collectively struggling to escape the chocolate monsters' gaping mouths.



"Talk"
July 2014 | Graphite | 16" x 20"

Throughout history, the world has been made much smaller with massive advancements in the tech industry, making communication across distances vastly more efficient with each passing year and decade. An antique telephone from the '40s is involved with a modern power outlet on a self-invented communication machine (the partial face casting). Three objects from three eras. Communication depends on verbal exchanges, hence the mouth sculpture is included as a component of the piece.

"Homerun.mp3"
February 2014 | Graphite | 16” x 20”

In the course of history, the world has been made much smaller with massive advancements in the tech industry, making communication across distances vastly more efficient with each passing year and decade. A vintage baseball glove is placed alongside a futuristic mp3 device that holds the shape of a modern baseball. Three objects from three eras. Communication depends on auditory reception, hence the ear sculpture is included as a component of the piece.


"Communication"
September 2014 | Graphite | 40” x 16”

☆ This piece received a gold key in the Drawing and Illustration division of The Scholastic, Inc. Art and Writing Awards. ☆

In April 2015, this piece was selected to exhibit and compete in the Illinois High School Art Exhibition Senior Portfolio Show and competition held at UIC’s Gallery 400 in Chicago. “Communication” won prizes and scholarships from several colleges and universities across the US. In the course of history, the world has been made so much smaller with the communication, which is growing more efficient with each passing decade. This piece conveys the power of time in bringing better communication. History has brought us the printing press, telegraphs, radios and televisions, computers, and smart phones. This piece is a panoramic view of my two invention drawings. This piece unites history with the present, the old-fashioned with the innovative, and all that has happened with what is to come. The mouth and ear castings represent the verbal and auditory components of communication.



"Perpetual Motion"
July 2014 | Graphite | 16" x 20"

Heavily inspired by surrealist painter Salvador Dali's “The Persistence of Time”, "Perpetual Motion" emphasizes the fluidity of time and the power of the non-present in engaging our current thoughts and emotions. In the realm of physical reality, events seem to occur on a straight, one-way timeline that moves from past to present to future. But in the human mind, individuals perceive the "timeline" (or lack thereof) more as a big ball of events all intertwined. Moments from the past easily bleed into the present in the form of nostalgia, regrets, or simple memories, while future happenings manifest themselves as present hopes, anxieties, or simple expectancies. Because events from both the past and the future often intrude on our present thoughts and decisions, "Perpetual Motion" is composed of many circular, revolving objects such as clocks and wheels.

(´▽`ʃƪ)♡
Thank you for viewing!
© Bre Huang 2016. All rights reserved.

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